The Parker Blog:

Working Motherhood and Coping with the Pandemic

Like many working mom’s, Parker’s Senior Vice President of Business Development, Lindsay Lundberg, thought she led as busy of a life as she could have. Balancing a career in sales with the needs of her family, which includes a three- and one year old, she says she couldn’t imagine being busier. All of that changed with the pandemic. Three months into stay-at-home orders, Lindsay laughs as she recounts her epiphany: “I thought I was so busy before with commuting and work and then all of a sudden everyone is under one roof all the time and I realized that I had it pretty good before.”

“You have to take a minute for yourself and take a deep breath.”

Lindsay was joined by Zee White, a sourcer recently relocated to Seattle, and Katy Riley, our SVP of Finance and Administration for today’s Parker Live! panel on being a mom during a pandemic. In our twenty-minute panel, Katy, Lindsay, and Zee expounded on what it’s like to be a mom during this time and how they have found success in their household. For Katy and Zee, things improved when they were able to construct a set schedule for their boys. Katy notes, “to manage a 13 year old at home while you are working a full time job, you have to make sure that he is meeting his schedule.”

You have to take a minute for yourself and take a deep breath.

Zee agrees. She discovered early on that remote learning meant more work, not less. Whereas before her 12 year old son would have 2-3 nights of homework, remote work meant school work every day. It wasn’t unusual for her son to have spent a full 8 hours of learning online. For her, successfully managing her son’s schedule meant recruiting other family members to help. “I know with some of the math problems, I don’t even remember and they have also changed how they do the problems. So, we broke it up: My mom helps with science, I help with social studies, and my dad and my younger brother help with math.”

My mom helps with science, I help with social studies, and my dad and my younger brother help with math.

Mothers with younger kids face different issues than mom’s with teenagers. Lindsay notes, “I’m sure there was a time four weeks ago when I called Katy and told her that I’ve bought the new troll movie five times!” Her three year old doesn’t understand that when Lindsay is around, that she may not be available to give her the full attention she wants. She continues, “when you have a full-time job and a full home, it’s about figuring out how to make it all work. I have to make sure that in addition to family, my clients and coworkers get the attention they deserve. Kids very much like to have things on their schedule. It’s been a balancing act.”

It’s not about good days or bad days, but good hours and bad hours.

Still, the stress isn’t without its rewarding moments. All three mothers have learned more about their kids than they would have without the pandemic. While Lindsay and Zee have come to realize that their kids are much more like them than they realized, Katy is watching her son navigate his growing independence at a time when he has to stay home. She advises, “try to be grateful and give yourself grace. It’s not about good days or bad days, but good hours and bad hours.”

For more of their perspectives on raising kids during a pandemic, check out the full interview on here.

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